Features page

Nov15

INDIVIDUAL

When All Plans Fail is written from a Christian perspective, and the core of the book is directed toward helping YOU as an individual prepare yourself and your family for the days ahead. Don’t Be a Victim! If you are not prepared, you are much more likely to be a victim and even be a barrier to the effectiveness of disaster response teams. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 revealed major weaknesses in local, regional and national response planning. Even in smaller disasters it may take several days for first response teams to reach you and your family.

The truth of the matter is that the majority of people have not adequately planned for common everyday crises, whether or not they reach the level of disasters. Let me ask you some practical questions that, if not answered in the affirmative, will often result in frustration and loss of valuable time and resources . . . or worse:

• Do you keep jumper cables in the trunk of your car?
• Do you keep flashlights with good batteries on hand, or do you have flashlights that do not require batteries?
• Do you keep an umbrella in your car?
• Do you have surge protectors for your critical electrical appliances and office equipment?
• Do you carry your computer in a properly padded case or handbag?
• Do you cover your sensitive plants to protect them from the cold when a freeze warning is issued?
• Do you wear protective clothing if you are going to do outside work where you know you will encounter poison ivy?
• Do you take along extra water when jogging or riding your bicycle on long excursions?
• Do you avoid lifting objects too heavy for you?
• Do you change the oil in your car on the recommended schedule?
• Do you have health insurance?
• Do you have life insurance (if you can afford it?)
• Do you have homeowners insurance?
• Do you pray every day?
• Do you read the Bible every day?

Practical things. Everyday things. No hype, no fear. Just doing what is practical and prudent.

You probably answered yes to many of these, if not most. In this same spirit, you can prepare for potential disasters in a way that will make you prepared and ready rather than a victim— and help others who can’t help themselves (see Chapter 7).

  • Posted by Williams/
  • /
  • Comments are Off
Read More
Jul15

FAMILY

Taking care of yourself and your family first is not a selfish act. Family members and possibly neighbors may be dependent on you. This is particularly true if you have small children, elderly parents in the home, or handicapped members.

With the high percentage of single-parent families and the need for two wage earners to make ends meet in other families, there is barely enough time to take care of the absolute necessities, much less adding anything to the agenda. I also see segments of our society alienated from the mainstream, young people who are pessimistic about the future and fatalistic toward what is coming to pass on the earth. These are significant barriers to disaster preparedness. This mindset is not unique to the United States. Having served in 105 nations, I see the same patterns of fear, uncertainty, and stress everywhere I go.

Yet this picture does not have to be true. For those of us who believe in Jesus, we can prepare for the worst with serenity. I once heard of an artist who was commissioned to paint a portrait of peace. Rather than painting some idyllic pastoral scene, he chose to depict a fierce storm beating against the craggy face of a mountain. Tucked safely in a cleft of the rock was a nest. In the nest was a little bird, her head thrown back. She was singing at the top of her lungs. The storm raged all around her, but she knew she was safe.

  • Posted by Williams/
  • /
  • Comments are Off
Read More
Jul15

CHURCH

Churches should take a leading role in disaster preparedness, regardless the size of the church. Churches are uniquely positioned to play a significant role in increasing the percentage of people who are prepared physically and spiritually. It is a “no-brainer” that much more would be accomplished if churches would work together in disaster preparedness and response. Chapter 15 presents church networking models to develop an effective inter-church communications system, help establish relationships with governmental officials and give guidance on how to mobilize effectively and quickly in times of crises.

Christians and the church also need to be prepared to help those who traditionally reject them and who hold widely disparate worldviews, both within our nation and internationally. It is important that we understand these views in order to minister to the people who hold a different worldview.

Significant segments of our society will not respond readily to the call for preparedness due to their pessimism about the future. Many are nihilistic, cynical, feel alienated, and mistrust traditional values. It is important for believers to come to grips with the fact that major segments of our nation’s young people are indifferent toward religion and may reject and even take a hostile stance toward the religion of their parents. Many do, in fact, believe in God or at least a “higher power” and are accepting the plurality of world religions. Those holding these views present a special challenge to the church and to those of us who are making the calls to prepare for storms that may lie ahead.

  • Posted by Williams/
  • /
  • Comments are Off
Read More
Jul15

COMMUNITY

The more you and your neighbors have prepared to take care of yourselves and your families individually, the more effective your neighborhood preparedness will be. If only you and your family are prepared for disasters, guess who will be coming knocking on your door? Your neighbors that have not prepared!

Steps One – Two – Three

• The first step in getting your neighborhood prepared is to be prepared yourself: Put Your Own Mask on First. This is the primary goal of this book: Getting you and your family ready.
• The second step is to encourage your neighbors to prepare themselves and their families.
• The third step is to form a neighborhood disaster preparedness network and develop a plan for your neighborhood.

  • Posted by Williams/
  • /
  • Comments are Off
Read More